headshot of Dennis Carlone in city hall; crop from city council's photo

Dennis Carlone

Currently
City Councilor

More about Dennis Carlone

Dennis Carlone is serving his second term on the Cambridge City Council.

He has been an architect and urban designer in Cambridge for over 30 years. In 1978, he was the Director of Design on the East Cambridge Riverfront Project, which developed the CambridgeSide Galleria and surrounding area. It received the American Institute of Architects Award for Excellence in Urban Design.

Incumbent
Yes
Age
72 years, 5 months
Born in 1947
Voter Registration
Oct. 4, 1980

Where does Dennis live?

Address
Rents at 9 Washington Ave, Cambridge, MA 02140 #6
Valued at approx. $660,000

Endorsements

Q&A

Interviews with the candidate

Green Cambridge

Sustainability and environmental health for all

Green Cambridge

Sustainability and environmental health for all

Mass Creative

Working with artists, leaders, supporters, and partners of the arts, cultural, and creative community to advocate for the resources and support necessary for the sector to thrive

Mass Creative

Working with artists, leaders, supporters, and partners of the arts, cultural, and creative community to advocate for the resources and support necessary for the sector to thrive

Harvard Square Neighborhood Association

Harvard Square and all things about it

Harvard Square Neighborhood Association

Harvard Square and all things about it

The Whistler

Introduction to the Candidates

The Whistler

Introduction to the Candidates

Vision Zero Coalition

Asking candidates about how to reduce Cambridge to zero fatalities or serious injuries on the road

Vision Zero Coalition

Asking candidates about how to reduce Cambridge to zero fatalities or serious injuries on the road

Cambridge Bike Safety

Supports safe biking infrastructure for all ages and abilities. Asked Candidates for statement on CBS's platform.

Cambridge Bike Safety

Supports safe biking infrastructure for all ages and abilities. Asked Candidates for statement on CBS's platform.

Our Revolution 2019

Our revolution supports a new generation of progressive leaders across the US.

Our Revolution 2019

Our revolution supports a new generation of progressive leaders across the US.

CRA Candidate Questionnaire

CRA is a local housing/growth-and-development focused group. They used their questionnaire to determine their endorsements.

CRA Candidate Questionnaire

CRA is a local housing/growth-and-development focused group. They used their questionnaire to determine their endorsements.

ABC Candidate 2019 Survey

A Better Cambridge is a local housing/growth-and-development focused group. They used their questionnaire to determine their endorsements.

ABC Candidate 2019 Survey

A Better Cambridge is a local housing/growth-and-development focused group. They used their questionnaire to determine their endorsements.

Vision Zero Coalition 2019

Asking candidates about how to reduce Cambridge to zero fatalities or serious injuries on the road

Vision Zero Coalition 2019

Asking candidates about how to reduce Cambridge to zero fatalities or serious injuries on the road

Quotes

We're the 10th densest city in the country, which means we have less public space on average than most dense cities.

Dennis Carlone, Important Issues Video

I'm trained as an architect, urban designer and was a consultant to the city of Cambridge for 30 years working on my project along the East Cambridge Riverfront.

Dennis Carlone, Backyard Cambridge Podcast

There are two visions of the future of our city. One vision is of high tech luxury skyscrapers where only the rich can afford to live. The second is one where communities thrive and residents can afford to raise a family, run a small business and not be forced out of the city.

Dennis Carlone, Candidate's Website

high-rise housing costs 50 percent more to build than traditional six-story housing due to fire safety and building codes. Subsequently, higher construction costs demand higher rents.

Press

Articles about the candidate

The Harvard Crimson Cambridge City Council Denounces Right-Wing Media Outlet

The council’s December 7 resolution, proposed by Councillor Dennis J. Carlone, characterized Breitbart as an “illegitimate tabloid” that should be disregarded.

None — Joshua Florence, Samuel Vasquez
The Harvard Crimson Cambridge City Council Denounces Right-Wing Media Outlet

The council’s December 7 resolution, proposed by Councillor Dennis J. Carlone, characterized Breitbart as an “illegitimate tabloid” that should be disregarded.

None — Joshua Florence, Samuel Vasquez
The Harvard Crimson Dennis Carlone (Profile)

And lastly, and it’s still an issue, the master plan. Cambridge did not have a master plan for fifty years, and I pushed that. And here’s the thing—the state requires every city and town to have a master plan. We somehow avoided that, and here we are in the middle of major development, major change, major traffic, lack of open space—all these issues, and we don’t even have a strategy to tie it all together. On top of that, it’s environmentalism, with the change in the climate. But I’m the guy who pushed through the plastic bag ban.

---

DC: I just want it in separate spaces. On top of that, I don’t want a storefront, retail. I want it to be more like a doctor’s office, if you will. Medicinal, that’s easy. If there’s medicinal in one place, recreational should be, I don’t know, at least 500, 1,000 feet away. Just so it doesn’t become so dense with activity, but spread it out. And, you know, I’ve been to Amsterdam, I know there are different worlds. It might come to that, but the first shot at it, let’s do it in an intelligent way. A number of towns have refused it. And you probably know that there’s at least five companies that want to open up medicinal here. And we only need three to serve the public. So, I think you’re going to see more and more in the liberal towns, so we have to be careful. I have no problem with it.

Nov. 1, 2017 — Shera Avi-Yonah
The Harvard Crimson Dennis Carlone (Profile)

And lastly, and it’s still an issue, the master plan. Cambridge did not have a master plan for fifty years, and I pushed that. And here’s the thing—the state requires every city and town to have a master plan. We somehow avoided that, and here we are in the middle of major development, major change, major traffic, lack of open space—all these issues, and we don’t even have a strategy to tie it all together. On top of that, it’s environmentalism, with the change in the climate. But I’m the guy who pushed through the plastic bag ban.

---

DC: I just want it in separate spaces. On top of that, I don’t want a storefront, retail. I want it to be more like a doctor’s office, if you will. Medicinal, that’s easy. If there’s medicinal in one place, recreational should be, I don’t know, at least 500, 1,000 feet away. Just so it doesn’t become so dense with activity, but spread it out. And, you know, I’ve been to Amsterdam, I know there are different worlds. It might come to that, but the first shot at it, let’s do it in an intelligent way. A number of towns have refused it. And you probably know that there’s at least five companies that want to open up medicinal here. And we only need three to serve the public. So, I think you’re going to see more and more in the liberal towns, so we have to be careful. I have no problem with it.

Nov. 1, 2017 — Shera Avi-Yonah
Scout Cambridge City Council Candidate Profiles, Group 2 of 5

What would your top three priorities be if elected?

1) Review all options to overcome Cambridge’s current housing crisis. This includes equitable zoning reform guided by urban design best practices, cost-effective construction, requiring our local universities to meet the dormitory needs of their students, requiring development of non-luxury priced housing that middle- and low-income residents can actually afford, and increasing the amount of city funds dedicated to affordable housing efforts.

Oct. 5, 2017 — Reena Karasin
Scout Cambridge City Council Candidate Profiles, Group 2 of 5

What would your top three priorities be if elected?

1) Review all options to overcome Cambridge’s current housing crisis. This includes equitable zoning reform guided by urban design best practices, cost-effective construction, requiring our local universities to meet the dormitory needs of their students, requiring development of non-luxury priced housing that middle- and low-income residents can actually afford, and increasing the amount of city funds dedicated to affordable housing efforts.

Oct. 5, 2017 — Reena Karasin
Cambridge Day Five ways to prioritize affordable housing, including units built just for grad students

these actions include:

1. Reforming zoning to maximize affordable housing production in mixed-use districts (recent Central Square zoning was modified to require a minimum of 50 percent residential construction on any site to reach maximum buildout);

2. Limiting Airbnb to only owner-occupied units, not units that are additionally owned but unoccupied;

3. Insisting long-needed university housing be built in the near future (many MIT and Harvard graduate students live in former family apartments);

4. Increasing the city budget allocation for Cambridge’s stated No. 1 issue, the creation of affordable housing. Previous budgets include only affordable housing funds generated by the Community Preservation Act, and not city funds. I am happy to share that the proposed 2018 city budget has finally included a $2.8 million line item for affordable housing. It is a good start that hopefully will be added to every year;

5. Recognizing that high-rise housing costs 50 percent more to build than traditional six-story housing due to fire safety and building codes. Subsequently, higher construction costs demand higher rents.

May 3, 2017 — Dennis Carlone
Cambridge Day Five ways to prioritize affordable housing, including units built just for grad students

these actions include:

1. Reforming zoning to maximize affordable housing production in mixed-use districts (recent Central Square zoning was modified to require a minimum of 50 percent residential construction on any site to reach maximum buildout);

2. Limiting Airbnb to only owner-occupied units, not units that are additionally owned but unoccupied;

3. Insisting long-needed university housing be built in the near future (many MIT and Harvard graduate students live in former family apartments);

4. Increasing the city budget allocation for Cambridge’s stated No. 1 issue, the creation of affordable housing. Previous budgets include only affordable housing funds generated by the Community Preservation Act, and not city funds. I am happy to share that the proposed 2018 city budget has finally included a $2.8 million line item for affordable housing. It is a good start that hopefully will be added to every year;

5. Recognizing that high-rise housing costs 50 percent more to build than traditional six-story housing due to fire safety and building codes. Subsequently, higher construction costs demand higher rents.

May 3, 2017 — Dennis Carlone
Cambridge Day Climate rally calls for all renewable energy, steps against ‘anti-science’ of White House

After a resident expressed alarm during City Council public comment over the roughly 200 trees on or around the soon-to-be-remade Volpe acreage in Kendall Square, councillor Dennis Carlone said he’d been told by developer MIT of techniques showing 80 percent success moving and replanting even mature trees. Carlone, who attended the afternoon climate rally, listed several places within Cambridge that “are just screaming for trees” and reminded city staff that “studies indicate that we are way behind in open space per capita.”

April 25, 2017 — Marc Levy
Cambridge Day Climate rally calls for all renewable energy, steps against ‘anti-science’ of White House

After a resident expressed alarm during City Council public comment over the roughly 200 trees on or around the soon-to-be-remade Volpe acreage in Kendall Square, councillor Dennis Carlone said he’d been told by developer MIT of techniques showing 80 percent success moving and replanting even mature trees. Carlone, who attended the afternoon climate rally, listed several places within Cambridge that “are just screaming for trees” and reminded city staff that “studies indicate that we are way behind in open space per capita.”

April 25, 2017 — Marc Levy
Cambridge Day Medical marijuana dispensary zoning OK’d with recreational pot looming as a concern

Councillors too expressed concerns about how the recent legalization of recreational marijuana might affect the zoning, with councillors Tim Toomey and Dennis Carlone confirming with city solicitor Nancy Glowa that “experienced” sellers of medical marijuana would be allowed under the state law to also sell recreational marijuana. Toomey said that decided his vote opposing the zoning; accounting for this concern, Carlone suggested an amendment, which was adopted, allowing the ordinance to go up for reconsideration after state law changes to allow recreational marijuana sales.

Feb. 7, 2017 — Chloe Reichel
Cambridge Day Medical marijuana dispensary zoning OK’d with recreational pot looming as a concern

Councillors too expressed concerns about how the recent legalization of recreational marijuana might affect the zoning, with councillors Tim Toomey and Dennis Carlone confirming with city solicitor Nancy Glowa that “experienced” sellers of medical marijuana would be allowed under the state law to also sell recreational marijuana. Toomey said that decided his vote opposing the zoning; accounting for this concern, Carlone suggested an amendment, which was adopted, allowing the ordinance to go up for reconsideration after state law changes to allow recreational marijuana sales.

Feb. 7, 2017 — Chloe Reichel
Wicked Local Cambridge How many marijuana dispensaries does Cambridge need?

Councilor Dennis Carlone agreed with both Maher and Kelley, saying he would like to reach out to appropriate departments to find out how many dispensaries are needed in Cambridge. The last time they had this discussion, Carlone said, the councilors all agreed they needed to look at a real district instead of making case-by-case decisions.

“I believe there aren’t that many [dispensaries] in the state. But how many do we need in our city? How many do we want between Central Square and Harvard Square and Alewife? It seems counterproductive,” he said.

Aug. 3, 2016 — Natalie Handy
Wicked Local Cambridge How many marijuana dispensaries does Cambridge need?

Councilor Dennis Carlone agreed with both Maher and Kelley, saying he would like to reach out to appropriate departments to find out how many dispensaries are needed in Cambridge. The last time they had this discussion, Carlone said, the councilors all agreed they needed to look at a real district instead of making case-by-case decisions.

“I believe there aren’t that many [dispensaries] in the state. But how many do we need in our city? How many do we want between Central Square and Harvard Square and Alewife? It seems counterproductive,” he said.

Aug. 3, 2016 — Natalie Handy
Wicked Local Cambridge Cambridge City Council names Denise Simmons mayor

At the ceremony, McGovern was chosen as vice mayor in an initial six-to-three vote.

Dennis Carlone, Mazen and Jan Devereux voted for Mazen as vice mayor at first, but changed their decision to McGovern before the vote was finalized. As stated before the vote was taken, councilors could change their vote before declared by the chair, but roll call could not be interrupted until all members had voted.

Jan. 6, 2016 — Natalie Handy
Wicked Local Cambridge Cambridge City Council names Denise Simmons mayor

At the ceremony, McGovern was chosen as vice mayor in an initial six-to-three vote.

Dennis Carlone, Mazen and Jan Devereux voted for Mazen as vice mayor at first, but changed their decision to McGovern before the vote was finalized. As stated before the vote was taken, councilors could change their vote before declared by the chair, but roll call could not be interrupted until all members had voted.

Jan. 6, 2016 — Natalie Handy
The Harvard Crimson Recount Confirms Original Election Results for Cambridge City Council

“Every recount is stressful; that’s just the nature of it. With things being so close, Minka had every right to ask for one,” said Carlone.

Dec. 13, 2013 — Conor Reilley
The Harvard Crimson Recount Confirms Original Election Results for Cambridge City Council

“Every recount is stressful; that’s just the nature of it. With things being so close, Minka had every right to ask for one,” said Carlone.

Dec. 13, 2013 — Conor Reilley

Campaign finance

How much the candidate has raised and spent

$26,661.16
Current balance
$0
Balance at the start of 2019
TBD
Raised in 2019
TBD
Spent in 2019